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There’s No Honor in So-Called “Honor Killings”

There’s No Honor in So-Called “Honor Killings”

Qandeel Baloch was a Pakistani celebrity who rose to fame through publicizing brazenly insolent and concerningly political comments. She was highly notorious for her countless erotic and flagrant photos she had uploaded on her social media sites.
Almost a week ago, she was strangled by her brother, Waseem Baloch, in a so-called “honor killing.” After being arrested, he expressed no regrets:
“I am proud of what I did. I drugged her first, then I killed her. She was bringing dishonor to our family… I will be remembered with pride and honor and by bringing honor to my family, I have earned a place in heaven.”
I understand she railed against the religious norms of Pakistan, but where is the “honor” in her killing?

I understand she railed against the religious norms of Pakistan, but where is the “honor” in her killing?

The Quran says, “and do not kill a soul that God has made sacrosanct, save lawfully.”
Murder is forbidden, but the death penalty imposed by the state for a crime is permitted. It continues, “whoso kills a soul, unless it be for murder or for wreaking corruption in the land, it shall be as if he had killed all mankind, and he who saves a life, it shall be as if he had given life to all mankind” (6:151).
Qandeel’s brother had no justifiable right to take Islam, and the law into his own hands. A person’s wrongdoing(s) are between them and Allah (SWT).

Qandeel’s brother had no justifiable right to take Islam, and the law into  his own hands. A person’s wrongdoing(s) are between them and Allah (SWT).

He writes their fate and determines whether guidance is a part of their future or not. But by “honorably” killing them, one is playing with and altering the wise plans of the Almighty.
Qandeel was not the first one who was infamous for defying the norms. Before her, a former actress, Veena Malik, was considered the ignominy of Pakistan for a bold photoshoot she had undertaken in India, and which had become viral on the internet in a matter of moments. Thankfully, she was not killed, but she was the subject of death threats.
Hundreds of Pakistani women and girls are murdered annually by their relatives in the name of family honor, and most suspects in these killings are not prosecuted.
According to the Independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, violence against women is rampant, with over 212 women being killed in the name of “honor” in the first five months of 2016.

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Hundreds of Pakistani women and girls are murdered annually by their relatives in the name of family honor, and most suspects in these killings are not prosecuted.  According to the Independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, violence against women is rampant, with over 212 women being killed in the name of “honor” in the first five months of 2016.

How does this culture represent us in international media? We are deteriorating our reputations ourselves by murdering those who we believe are doing wrong. Instead of bettering our image or ameliorating our thinking, we are, in fact, degrading our society.
These “honor killings” are presenting a kibosh for the entire Pakistani society in its furtherance towards cultural, societal, and intellectual improvement.
Such violence breeds intolerance, ignorance, and developmental impediments; it promotes weaknesses and flaws in our country, and collaboratively, we need to eradicate such mentality that titles unjustifiable murders of women and girls as “honor killings.”
“It is command of Allah (swt) to forgive those who wronged you, to give to those who deprived you, and to tie relations with those who severe theirs with you” (Archangel Gabriel). “Show mercy and you shall be shown mercy. Forgive others and you shall be forgiven by Allah (SWT)” (Prophet Muhammad PBUH).
Honor killings are not a part of Islam, and they show no such mercy or forgiveness.
Contributed by Sajeela Rehman

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