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What’s Next for Turkey After the Attempted Coup?

What’s Next for Turkey After the Attempted Coup?

Will democracy and the rule of law remain under Erdogan’s rescued government?
The government of President Recep Erdogan has already experienced a remarkable resurgence in power and control over Turkey merely days after Friday’s failed coup.
Less than a week ago, the world watched as a faction of the Turkish army blockaded the Bosphorus Bridge, and declared that it had taken control of Turkey, and established a curfew “to protect the democratic order and to maintain human rights.”
As his whereabouts remained shrouded in mystery, the democratically elected President Erdogan incredulously addressed his people via Facetime. His call for the Turkish people to ‘convene at public squares and airports’ in defense of democracy resonated with the scores of people who turned out to the streets of Istanbul in protest of the military takeover.
Whether the subsequent failure of the coup can be attributed to the power of popular protest, or the incompetence of the coup orchestrators is yet unclear. The army’s strategic misstep of attacking the Turkish parliament for the first time since the 1920s, and the arrival of  President Erdogan in Istanbul marked a decisive change of tide in favor of the Turkish government. The condemnation by several prominent military officials of the coup reinforced that the attempt to overthrow the Turkish government was an act of a small faction of the Turkish army.
By Saturday the coup had collapsed, claiming the lives of 290 people. Protesters took over the tanks on the Bosphorus, and soldiers surrendered en masse as the government worked to reestablish control over the State.
As the dust settles on the events of the past week or so, there have been crucial developments that indicate the potential fallout from the failed coup. As it stands almost 3000 soldiers have been detained, and over 2700 judges have been fired.

As the dust settles on the events of the past week or so, there have been crucial developments that indicate the potential fallout from the failed coup. As it stands almost 3000 soldiers have been detained, and over 2700 judges have been fired.

The Erdogan government has been gradually chipping away at democratic processes and the rule of law in the days following the failed coup. The statements of President Erdogan have sparked concerns that the attempted coup could act as a pretext for a wide crackdown against government dissidents.

The Erdogan government has been gradually chipping away at democratic processes and the rule of law in the days following the failed coup. The statements of President Erdogan have sparked concerns that the attempted coup could act as a pretext for a wide crackdown against government dissidents.

The actions of the army had no specific constitutional justification. However, the Turkish army have traditionally viewed themselves as guardians of the constitution and the secular, democratic principles that grounded Ataturk’s vision of Turkey. The tensions between the secular origins of the modern Turkish state and the more overtly Islamic Erdogan government have been simmering since the Gezi Park protests, during which thousands were arrested and dozens died. At the centre of both events was a distrust of the Erdogan governments tightened controls over democratic freedoms, and movement away from secularism.

The tensions between the secular origins of the modern Turkish state and the more overtly Islamic Erdogan government have been simmering since the Gezi Park protests, during which thousands were arrested and dozens died. 

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The government of Erdogan has already linked the events of Friday to an exiled government dissident and preacher/scholar Fethullah Gulen. President Erdogan has also made calls for the United States to extradite Gulen to Turkey on insurrection charges.
There are also concerns being raised about the comments of Erdogan, that attempts may be made to reinstate the death penalty which was abolished in 2004. The sanctity of the rule of law in Turkey is also being questions, as fears rise that the Turkish government may bypass judicial processes, in dealing with ‘coup leaders’ and the thousands of soldiers arrested.
A democratically elected government, which has survived due to the democratic will of the Turkish people, undermining the judiciary and the rule of law, would be a bitter taste of irony for the Turkish people.

A democratically elected government, which has survived due to the democratic will of the Turkish people, undermining the judiciary and the rule of law, would be a bitter taste of irony for the Turkish people. 

Ultimately, the broader implications of the failed coup for the Turkish people and State, as well as the Middle East and Europe remain unclear. However it is clear that the attempted coup has shattered any remaining illusions that Turkey is immune from the political problems of its Middle Eastern neighbors in Libya, Egypt, and the rest of the Middle East.

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  • Salaam! I really love the work you’ve done with this blog MASHALLAH I’m so glad I found it! Really love your YouTube videos too!!!!

  • I am a muslim girl living in Canada. Recently, I started to read many of the blog posts on this website and have liked many of your posts on Facebook as well. However, I am disappointed to see such a stance being taken about the events that are occurring in Turkey after the attempted failed coup. In reference to your comments in this paragraph; I especially had many concerns “the Erdogan government has been gradually chipping away at democratic processes and the rule of law in the days following the failed coup. ” Many citizens that were unarmed were harmed by military officials that had desires to overthrow the government. Although, this government was elected by the majority of the people. Those elected in the government to be attempted to be removed by acts of terror and the use of violence shows that people that were pro coup were going against what the majority of the population had voted for in the first place. Democracy means that if the majority wishes for certain individuals to hold place in office they should be able to do so without fear that they are going to be forced and threatened to leave their positions. As a result this is an act by the pro coup members against democracy and the peoples vote. Above all the people have the power to change the course of the country. No terror or use of violence can take that away from the people. So after this coup has been attempted we must realize that there must be consequences to those who attempted to overthrow democracy and the peoples vote. Therefore, the country naturally must take actions against these people who also harmed innocent citizens. The acts following the attempted failed coup are not acts “tightening controls over democratic freedoms” by the government of Erdogan. Rather it the consequences of the actions of pro coup members and attempts to reach justice after they have harmed innocent citizens and risked democracy. It is natural that after someone goes against the law that they face the consequences of their actions. In the end, I no longer wish to read this blog that blurs the fact that the government of Erdogan is striving to gain justice for the people of Turkey rather than to gain more power.

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