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4 Ways to Handle the Situation if Eid Lands on 9/11

4 Ways to Handle the Situation if Eid Lands on 9/11

Let’s take a moment to consider the possibility of the Eid falling on a day that the world (including us) marks as a sad day in history — 9/11. Here are four recommendations I have compiled to help you if this should happen:

1. Don’t apologize, don’t pander, don’t posture.

Eid is, first and foremost, a celebration. Yes, we reflect on the historical and religious significance of this holiday, but it’s not a somber day of remembrance. There is no need to downplay festivities or to feel ashamed of your anticipation and excitement.
It has long been time for us, as a community, to stop apologizing (and paying) for a crime we didn’t commit.

It has long been time for us, as a community, to stop apologizing (and paying) for a crime we didn’t commit.

2. Don’t reference 9/11 in conjunction with Islam, Eid, or your Muslim identity.

If we continue to associate it with us, others will continue to associate it with us. Forget writing a “Eid landing on 9/11 this year was totally unintentional” Facebook status.
Who are you clarifying that for? Doesn’t everyone have access to Google? You might be itching to explain, but you would be doing far more harm than good to your community.

3. Go to the mosque and celebrate Eid.

Seriously. There’s no Muslim council that convenes to pick a date, it’s a coincidence, we have only two Eids a year, and we deserve to celebrate.
Would we strip any other group of the religious freedom to observe their holidays under similar circumstances?

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4. Be aware of your surroundings, and most of all, stay safe!

Would we strip any other group of the religious freedom to observe their holidays under similar circumstances?


Written by Sara Zayed

View Comments (4)
    • Well, do you expect say…all white people to apologise for the crimes of Europe (those of the past and present)? If your answer is no, then you’ve already answered your question. There is a difference between Jews and Israelis. Just as we Muslims are not responsible for the crimes of terrorists, so too are Jews all over the world not responsible for the crimes of the Israeli government. The difference though is that most Muslims are repulsed by ISIS and terrorist groups, whereas Israel still does enjoy the support of mainstream Jewish communities. That said, more and more Jews find Israel’s actions troubling and therefore do not support Israel or its policies. It certainly is not helpful to stigamatise whole communities for the actions of a few as this would just further alienate them.

      • Yes, but as a Jew (I’m Bill Weinberg, editor of World War 4 Report, and an ethnic although not religious Jew), I feel I do have a special responsibility to protest Israel’s crimes—because Israel purports to act in the name and interests of all Jews. True, the bombing of Gaza was a “crime we didn’t commit” (we meaning diaspora Jews), but that doesn’t mean we bear no responsibility.

        • Hi Bill. Nice to meet you. You actually make a valid point. I think we have a responsibility to speak out against what’s done in our name. However it’s worrying when people believe that “we” (jews, muslims, blacks, latinos etc) should be held collectively accountable and collectively punished too. Because that’s the views I’ve seen expressed on various social media. I’m just afraid the world is becoming more right-wing and dissolving into madness. On another note, I’ll definitely keep a lookout for your work….should be interesting

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