With the rapidly growing industry of inclusive sportswear, it is vital to make sure that all minorities from all parts of the world should be represented and considered in a field so important. This is an issue especially in North America, where these minorities lie within bigger populations that are often represented easily and frequently in media and the global market.

I am ecstatic that models like Halima are killing the game, scoring covers on mainstream magazines like Vogue, and proudly donning modest swimwear on Sports illustrated, whilst companies like Thawrih (pronounced /TH•ow•rē/) are making sure to continue supporting those sportswomen who choose to don modest wear through a wide selection of modest activewear.

“Our mission is to revolutionize activewear for those that have religious and cultural obligations and to make sports accessible to all.” tweet

Muslim Girl interviewed the co-founder and CEO of Thawrih, Sarah Abood, to find out more about their mission and the role they are playing in their community, and what we found was fascinating.

Thawrih is a Canadian company based in Ottawa that broke barriers with their work. In 2017, the idea of the clothing line came to the founder as she discovered that the clients at her gym were finding it incredibly hard to work with the sweat and inaccessibility of the clothes they were wearing to workout. Many activewear companies existed at the time, but many people around Sarah complained that the clothing just wasn’t fashionable enough, even for a casual workout.

Thawrih Activewear on full display, including their organic, bamboo headscarves.

Around the same time, Sarah started a nonprofit organization for Syrian refugees in Ottawa who could not find employment because of language, transportation, and cultural barriers.

Hence, Sarah started a clothing company where refugees from different places like Syria, Iraq, Angola, and other minorities can work from home to create the clothing. This opportunity to earn a living wage was created to empower these refugees comfortably. Determined to ensure that all those who need it have the opportunity to earn, as well as financially empowering newcomers, minorities, and refugees, Thawrih also provides employment opportunities to universities students from Ottawa, starting with internships.

Not only does Thawrih create modest activewear for active Muslim women, but they also ventured into sports turbans for the Sikh population. How’s that for unity and inclusivity? tweet

Sarah Abood found that after the startup of Thawrih, people around her were further encouraged to go to the gym. Thawrih continued successfully by selling over 900 products to 23 countries worldwide. Another remarkable achievement in their Canadian society was that Thawrih became the main face to create activewear for minorities working in the Ottawa police force. Not only does Thawrih create modest activewear for active Muslim women, but they also ventured into sports turbans for the Sikh population. How’s that for unity and inclusivity?

Thawrih’s take on a customizable length sports turban.

Thawrih means “to revolutionize”, and at Thawrih HQ, they believe that the revolution starts with empowerment in strength, movement, and being able to be yourself. What’s more, the revolution comes with a healthy side of being proud to help and empower newcomers and minorities.

They aim for inclusivity, whether in size or modesty, and Thawrih successfully sticks to their admirable mission in a competitive industry: “Our mission is to revolutionize activewear for those that have religious and cultural obligations and to make sports accessible to all.”

They aim to continue tailoring for more than one religion, and create a family within people who have been marginalized.

So let’s take a page out of the Thawrih playbook and always remember to #OwnYourSkin, whether you are Muslim, Sikh, or any other religion.

You can follow Thawrih on Instagram and visit their website for updates.

Image courtesy of Thawrih
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