What the Truck Bombings in Somalia Unveil About the Recovering Nation

What the Truck Bombings in Somalia Unveil About the Recovering Nation

Written by Amal Matan


In the broken-hearted aftermath of the Mogadishu truck bombings, the Somalian community is reeling. The shocking attacks were committed on a larger scale than anything the nation has faced before.

The loss of civilian life is massive: at least 300 individuals have lost their lives, hundreds more are injured and approximately 100 people are feared missing.

What this attack means for the future of Somalia, its civil conflict, and for Somalis within and outside of the country’s borders is largely unknown.

Since 1991, Somalia’s people have endured the brunt of the cost of civil discord, division, collapse and conflict. Adding to the complexity of the war, increasingly frequent famines have ravaged the country, while U.S. foreign policy and interests allow for scarce aid.

Even those individuals lucky enough to escape in the exodus from the widespread diaspora have been ultimately shaped by the distant, yet familiar strife through the often exhausting toll separation and homesickness causes. If anything, only to be Somali is a battle to carry the heavy weight and legacy of those scars.

What this attack means for the future of Somalia, its civil conflict, and for Somalis within and outside of the country’s borders is largely unknown. tweet

The wreckage and rubble of Mogadishu has and will take an innumerable toll on the lives of every Somali regardless of proximity.

As of 2015, Somalia was officially recognized by the UN as a recovering state, after being designated as a failed state in the brutal 24-year civil war.

In the face of horrific loss, there is reason for hope: the national response is unprecedented for the country.The protesters that immediately gathered following the attacks to take a resolute and public unified stance against terror are a testament to Somalia’s resilience

The presence of a governing leadership is also something that has been largely absent in recent memory.

But in the face of such horror, there is some semblance of transnational unity stirred by the raw trauma.

 

The act of leadership that was displayed in the aftermath of the attack and its condemnation is something worth commending.

The wreckage and rubble of Mogadishu has and will take an innumerable toll on the lives of every Somali regardless of proximity. tweet

However, on the global stage, there’s an unsurprising list of routine statements from foreign emissaries and leaders. Political reactions range from condolences to crocodile tears. Worse is the lack of coverage a terrorist attack of this gravity has received from global media outlets. The absence of attention and the presence of crocodile tears, or none at all, by the Muslim community remind many Black Muslims in particular that the loss of Black Muslim lives is inconsequential to many.

Moreover, the most vulnerable Somalis cannot depend on foreign policy, foreign security like AMISON, the UN and foreign aid to be reliable and held accountable in even the gravest tragedies without the possibility of endangerment or depraved abuses.

During this turbulent time, here’s what you can do:

In efforts to establish some sort of independent aid, the Somali diaspora have created internal community campaigns to send financial aid directly to those in need.

As of now, the sheer amount of wounded alone has overwhelmed the capital cities limited medical sites and resources.

First responders, doctors and ambulances are in need of funding. Like Aamiin Ambulance, the Dr. Hawa Abdi Foundation and Somali Faces’s Campaign for Victims.

Listen, educate, spread awareness, make du’a and donate.

Inshaa Allah, the road to recovery will be swift. May Somalia’s resilient spirit be strong, forever. Soomaliyaa haa noolato. Amiin.

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What the Truck Bombings in Somalia Unveil About the Recovering Nation
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