8 Extraordinary Muslim Women to Look up to in Our Everyday Lives

8 Extraordinary Muslim Women to Look up to in Our Everyday Lives

As Muslim women, I know we’re exhausted of not seeing our identities represented in various spaces and dialogues. I know it becomes draining to search for Muslim figures to look up to. We also sometimes find ourselves fumbling to identify and reference revolutionary women to prove to others that our women in Islam are not oppressed.

This is why we created a list of extraordinary women in different fields that represent our diverse identities. The list consists of both widely known and lesser recognized women because it is important to acknowledge Muslim women are present in all places. This is for all my Muslim Girls out there looking for themselves everywhere.


 

Screen Shot 2017-03-08 at 1.01.00 PMBouchra Alami, mother of a Muslim Girl writer, Marwa Adina, and her mother tweet

Yup, that’s my mamma and her mamma. This one is a thank you to all our mothers and daughters. Generational obstacles create room for revolutionary and rebellious women that stand up in unity. Love you, Mom.

 

tweet

Tawakkol Karman tweet

Known as the “Iron Woman”, she became the face of a revolution and founded the Women Journalists Without Chains organization.

 

Mukhtar Mai  tweet

Gang raped then paraded naked through the streets, this incredibly fearless lady successfully persecuted her attackers and set a precedent for other rape survivors in Pakistan that they, too, can stand up for themselves.

Let’s say one big Mashallah for all the women in our lives. Let’s say Mashallah for all the women who are not in our lives. Let us support one another regardless of the form or the distances that separate us. tweet

 

Safia Elhillo  tweet

A Sudanese poet who discusses immigration, love and the diasporic experience through haunting and skillfully written tales of finding home.

 

tweet

Ahlam Abid, the mother of Iman Abid, one of our writers tweet

“For inspiring one of our writers to break walls and ceilings so that the voices of the minority are heard from the highest of mountains. No heart is as beautiful and pure as yours, Mama. Thank you.”

 

tweet

The mother of Laila Khan, a Muslim Girl writer

“A nurse, a mother of two boys and my sister. Someone who has always made me feel safe and inspired me to be stronger in all aspects of my life. My #1 since day one.”

 

tweet

Randa Abdel-Fattah tweet

She is an Australian-Muslim writer. Her books capture Muslim life and experiences in an inspiring and comforting way. She writes from a very realistic perspective and makes the voice of the Muslim girl heard in her stories. Perhaps her most widely-known novel is Does My Head Look Big in This? 

 

The mother of Nihal Mubarak, a Muslim Girl writer

“My grandmother was the strongest woman I know. She carried herself in such a way that no one ever doubted she was a good, humble lady. And she was always just that–a lady. I never heard her raise her voice or speak ill of anyone. After my mother, she’s the one person I hope to be like most.”


 

Let’s say one big Mashallah for all the women in our lives. Let’s say Mashallah for all the women who are not in our lives. Let us support one another regardless of the form or the distances that separate us.

It is vital that we discover who represents us in our life in different corners of the world. It is equally critical to acknowledge our younger women who may look up to us one day.

Here’s to strong women. May we know them. May we be them. May we raise them.

For this year’s international women’s month, let the world hear about your stories and the stories of those whom you look up to. But, don’t end it there. Continue offering support and spurring dialogue far past the end of this month.

Until then, stay bad-ass y’all. I’m proud of you.

Now Reading:
8 Extraordinary Muslim Women to Look up to in Our Everyday Lives
4 minutes read
Search Stories